Government and Economics

(5 customer reviews)

From: $92.00 / month for 8 months

Grades: 9th-12th

Level: Regular (R) or Honors (H)

Class (Sec 1): Tue 1:00–2:00 p.m. ET

Class (Sec 2): Fri 12:00–1:00 p.m. ET

Dates: August 26, 2024–May 9, 2025

Prepaid: $649 (R), $699 (H)

Instructor: Nate Gilbert

Note: Students can also choose to enroll in one semester of economics or one semester of government. Also an Economics and Government full year course meets on Thursday.

See Reviews of Instructor Nate Gilbert

Enrollment in this class is currently closed.

Course Description

This is a full-year course offered Tuesday 1:00–2:00 p.m. ET or Friday 12:00–1:00 p.m.ET. An Economics and Government full-year course meets on Thursdays.

In this course, students take the Government half during the first semester and the Economics half during the second semester.

Government (1st Semester)

Sample Course Syllabus

Why should a high school student study US government? First, everyone in The United States will be thrust into the position of voter at the age of 18. Second, the growth of our national government has meant that the federal government reaches into more and more of our everyday decisions. Third, there are a variety of issues emanating from Washington, DC and the state capitals every day. In order to not be swayed by every passing fad, it is crucial that students understand why our political institutions exist. Lastly, an educated citizenry is necessary to carry on good public discourse and maintain our republic.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the principles behind the United States government and political institutions and to enable the students to interact with various viewpoints. Students will understand the historical development of our current political situation, analyze the political process, and describe how various political groups function today. The goal is for students to become familiar with public policies, our Constitutional underpinnings, and political behavior in our society. Students should then be able to appropriately apply their understanding to evaluate how just and appropriate various political actions are. The course will include engaging group discussions in the weekly live session.

Some weekly course concepts include:

  • What is legitimate government, and how did the Founders envision it?
  • What different types of federalism have been debated and utilized in American government?
  • The three branches of the national government (their functions, original design, and current practices)
  • Political parties and their role in American government
  • How does policy making occur? What is the role of the bureaucracy?
  • The Constitution and the limits it places on government activities
  • How does the media shape perceptions?
  • America’s role in the world (past and present)

Honors Level

The honors level is designed for students that are advanced and would like to explore the topic in more depth. The honors section will have one extra assignment per week. It may require more difficult reading and writing elements. Everything else (including quizzes) will remain the same.

Course Structure

Students will have weekly homework assignments, which will reinforce and expand upon the classroom discussions. Regular assignments may include watching a video online, reading an article, or completing worksheets. Some examples of assignments include the following: playing a simulation game about the tasks of the president, writing an essay about the life of a founding father, comparing viewpoints about US foreign policy before WWII, evaluating media sources and their coverage of current events, and contrasting the platforms of various political parties. There is an estimated 3-4 hours of work per week outside of the live class. Every class is recorded and I post the recording for viewing after each class. Therefore, students can catch up if they happen to miss the live session. There is one quiz and assignment to be completed after the final live class session.

This course can be used to satisfy the prerequisite for my AP US Government and Politics course.

Who should enroll?

This course is designed for students in grades 9-12 to fulfill the typical requirements of a high school government course. The maximum class size is 16 students to encourage student engagement.

Technology Requirements

  • High speed, broadband Internet
  • Web cam, sound card, and microphone (for live sessions)
  • Streaming video capabilities to watch recorded lectures

Evaluation and Feedback

Students will receive comments and individualized feedback on their assignments via Canvas. Work will be graded, and student questions will be addressed, in a timely manner.

Communication

Parents do not need to contact me before registering for this class. I will confirm registration with parents and provide a welcome email to students. All parents should join Canvas as observers, and I will respond to any parental questions.

 

Economics (2nd Semester)

Sample Course Syllabus

The course introduces students to the world of economic thinking. Students will begin to define economic concepts, understand why economists choose to view the world through a particular lens, and analyze the economic interactions of the people and businesses they observe in society. A primary goal is for students to become familiar with foundational market concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, comparative advantages, and inflation. Students should then be able to appropriately apply their economic understanding to personal decisions, businesses’ activities, and government policies. The course focuses mainly on microeconomics, but will also touch on some macroeconomic ideas.

Honors Level

The honors level is designed for students that are advanced and would like to explore the topic in more depth. The honors section will have one extra assignment per week. It may require more difficult reading and writing elements. Everything else (including quizzes) will remain the same.

Course Structure

The course will be very engaging, including group discussions and activities. Students will be expected to contribute to class activities in the live classroom or through the class discussion board. Each student will also have weekly homework assignments, which will reinforce and expand upon the classroom discussions. Some examples of assignments include the following: running a virtual lemonade stand and identifying economic principles used, watching a video about minimum wage laws, making a government budget using certain economic and social goals, comparing the economic and government structures of two different countries in the world, playing a stock simulation game, and reading about the history of money and inflation. There is an estimated 3-4 hours of work per week outside of the live class. There is one quiz and assignment to be completed after the final live class session.

Here is a preview of some of the weekly topics:

  • Scarcity, Resources, Opportunity Cost, Cost/Benefit Analysis
  • Supply and Demand Shifts, Elasticity, Types of Goods
  • Diminishing Returns, Allocation of Scarce Goods, Specialization
  • Trade in Competitive Markets, Transaction Costs
  • Understanding Economic Institutions (Banks, Corporations, Cooperatives, Labor unions), Rules of the Game
  • The Role of Government in the Economy (Taxes, Externalities, Regulations)
  • Nature and Causes of Money (Valuation, Historical Development, Inflation)
  • Comparing Economic Systems (Market, Command, Traditional, Mixed)
  • International Trade and Economic Growth
  • Stocks and Investment Options (with simulation stock buying opportunity)

Who should enroll?

This class is recommended for 9th-12th graders. Eighth graders accepted if advanced in their studies and work ethic. The course is intended to fulfill the typical requirements for a half year high school level course.

Technology Requirements

  • High speed, broadband Internet
  • Web cam, sound card, and microphone (for live sessions)
  • Streaming video capabilities to watch recorded lectures

Evaluation and Feedback

Students will receive comments and individualized feedback on their assignments via Canvas. Work will be graded, and student questions will be addressed, in a timely manner.

Communication

Parents do not need to contact me before registering for this class. I will confirm registration with parents and provide a welcome email to students. All parents should join Canvas as observers, and I will respond to any parental questions.

 

Required Texts

 

  • No textbook purchase is necessary. I pull information from various resources and from free online textbooks, such as Khan Academy and CK12 FlexBooks.

 

5 reviews for Government and Economics

  1. Nico

    I took both Government and Economics with Mr. Gilbert this year. I had an okay understanding of government going into it so I felt I managed well, but I was anxious about Economics because I had more limited knowledge going into it. I was pleasantly surprised, however, and Mr. Gilbert was a very nice teacher to learn from. He doesn’t just lecture in class, he keeps everyone engaged and is easy to approach about questions. Also, I was sick for a chunk of the semester and he was super understanding throughout, unlike many teachers, and the workload is manageable so I didn’t fall behind.

  2. Liesel Owsinski

    The group aspect of this class was very beneficial. It was sometimes frustrating to feel like there was a liberal bias.

    • Debra Bell

      We highly value our students’ course reviews and take them to heart! Mr. Gilbert tries to teach the class in an unbiased way that demonstrates a variety of viewpoints–that is an important aspect of the course. Some past students have thought the class had a conservative bias. Please be assured that all perspectives are welcome and Mr. Gilbert endeavors to use resources spanning the political spectrum that help students understand how the U.S. government and economic systems work, as well as, the underlying political tensions that influence both institutions.

  3. Will Stevens

    I loved these courses! Their content was very informative and the work was hard but still manageable. The live classes were very well put together, easy to take notes on, and Mr. Gilbert’s teaching style made things very easy and enjoyable to understand. I learned so much in these classes and really felt like my knowledge of these subjects was expanded. These courses were just great! Thanks so much Mr. Gilbert!

  4. Madeline Sink

    I have nothing but high regards for Mr. Gilbert and both of his classes. The workload was very manageable and informative. That is not to say the work was easy, but that there are usually about 4-5 assignments per week. During class, we would learn about a particular area or topic in class. It was easy to take notes with the power point slides, which is crucial to succeed because the weekly quizzes are based off of the topics from class. The topics we covered were interesting to say the least and it helped me to see the world through a more mature and knowledgeable lens. We would look at an argument or issue from different lenses to not create bias but to let us decide which side would fit more with our values. The assignments are also eye-opening and help to retain information that we learned from class. Also, don’t be afraid to ask questions in class. In addition to the benefit of the course material, I have also seen a personal gain from this class. I believe that to be a good citizen is to be an informed citizen. I believe these two classes have helped me to become a more informed citizen and has given me knowledge that I can add to my conservative, Christian values to use in deciphering the world around me. Thank You Mr. Gilbert for being a great teacher and for making this high school requirement more than just a requirement.

  5. Josiah B

    Great course, very challenging and informative.

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Instructor Bio

Nate Gilbert

Nate Gilbert graduated from Cedarville University in 2002 with a B.A. degree in secondary social studies education. Since then he has taught and tutored many students, primarily in the subjects of history, government, and economics. Nate has worked in a variety of settings, such as teaching in Beijing, China, and at some local schools. He now focuses on utilizing his passion for social studies to teach online classes that stimulate his students’ critical thinking skills and understanding of society. Contact: ngilbert[at]aimacademy.online

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All classes taught by Nate Gilbert